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This page is designed to make everyone be introduced, be familiarized and assist those who are finding tree species and plants in the Philippines. All information is reviewed by our staff prior to posting and every attempt is made to keep this page informative. Although we have tried to ensure that the content of this “Trees and Plants Directory” to be as accurate and perfect as possible, however some details might have been overlooked.

Therefore, if you find an error or would like to further help us update our “Trees and Plants Directory”, please let us know, you are most welcome. We maintain the right to accept other information regarding “Trees and Plants” or any other data or topic you know which you consider worthy of that may be shared with us for correction and development of this listing. If you wish to participate, please notify us by e-mail and feel free to express the ideas you know to help enrich the awareness of others.


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TREES and PLANTS DIRECTORY
Acacia
Mangium
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African Tulip
Spathodea Campanulata
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Alahan
Guioa Koelreuteria
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Almon
Shorea Almon
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Alpay
Litchi Chinensis
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Amamali
Leea Aculeata
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Amuyong
Goniothalamus Amuyon
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Anabiong
Trema Orientalis
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Anang
Diospyros Pyrrhocarpa
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Antipolo
Artocarpus Blancoi
This wood is used for house posts and other purposes requiring durability; for paneling, furniture and cabinet work, and musical instruments as a substitute for Nangka; and for making bancas. The bark ofThis tree is retted and used by highland folks for making clothes.
Anubing 
Artocarpus Ovatus 
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Anyatan
Cleistanthus Blancoi 
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Apitong 
D. Grandiflorus
This wood is used for posts, beam, joists, rafters, and flooring of house; for building bridges and wharves; for making wagon beds, automobile bodies, framing for barges and lighters, railroad cars, medium-grade furniture, telegraph and telephone poles; and for other purposes where hard and heavy timber are required.
Bagarbas 
Hydnocarpus Sumatrana 
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Bagras
-
-
Bagtikan 
Parashorea Malaan 
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BaguiLumbang 
Reutealis Trisperma
This wood is used in caulking material. –This is supplied by the Pagsahingan resin, Palosapis resin, Balau, and BaguiLumbang Oil mixed with lime and Bamboo.
Bakau, Mangrove
Rhizophora 
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Bakauan Gubat 
Carallia Brachiata 
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Balanti 
Homalanthus Populneus 
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Balete 
Ficus Benjamina
Home of the"Kapre"
Balitbitan 
Cynometra Ramiflora 
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Balukanag 
Hisocheton Cumingianus 
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Banaba 
Lagerstroemia Speciosa 
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Bansalaguin
Mimusops Elengi var. Parvifolia 
[Sapotaceae] [Mimusops parvifolia L., Bansalague or Bansalagui or Bansalaque] a large tree of the Philippines and southwest Pacific area that produces an edible fruit and a very dense fine-grained wood that is reddish or reddish white This wood is similar to Betis. It is used for ship’s wheels, marlinespikes, and fine tool handles for wharf and bridge construction; and as a substitute for dogwood in making shuttles, bobbins, and violin bows. It is durable even when exposed to the weather or in contact with the ground.
Basikong Kalauang 
Ficus botryocarpa 
Bayag-Usa 
Voacanga Globosa
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Bayanti 
Aglaia Rimosa 
This wood is used for making furniture, cabinets, and agricultural implements; and for purposes requiring hard, heavy, and durable wood
Bayok 
Pterospermum Diversifolium
This wood is used for posts, beams, joists, rafters, flooring, sheathings, ceilings; for furniture and cabinet work; and for making baseball bats, tool handles, carriage and wagon shafts, and household and agricultural implements.
Big-Leaf Mahogany 
Swietenia Macrophylla 
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Binunga 
Macaranga Tinarius 
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Broad Winged Apitong 
D. Kunstleri 
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Butong
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[Vis. Bitoon] Common medium beach Forest tree
Dalingdingan 
Hopea Foxworthyi 
This wood is utilized for high-grade construction, such as bridges, wharves, railroad ties, ship framing, piles, and other purposes that require strong and durable wood.
Dalunot 
Pipturus Arborescens 
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Dao
-
-
Duguan
Myristica Philippensis
This wood is used for temporary construction and for making boxes, crates, and molding.  This is not very durable, unless treated. This wood should not be used in permanent structures. 
Duhat
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[Java plum, Black plum, Damson plum, Duhat plum, Jambolan, Jambolan plum, Malabar plum, Portuguese plum.] [French: Faux  Pistachier, Jambolon], Syzygium Cumini Linn. Skeels [Myrtaceae]. The fruit is used in the manufacture of red wine, Tinto Dulce. The fruit is medicinal and is also a good source of calcium. The wood can also be used for light construction works.
Dungon
Heritiera Sylvatica
The wood is used for building posts, beams, joists, rafters, foundation sills, piles, paving blocks, wharves, ship frames, keels, keelsons, and rudders; and for making hubs, spokes, axels, capstan bars and other levers, tool handles, mallets, and other wooden tools. Dungon is recommended for steamed bent work where strength and durability are required. 
Dungon-Late
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This wood is hard, heavy, tough, and flexible. The heartwood is rarely attacked even by termites. The sapwood is good for piles, posts, foundation sills, railroad ties, paving blocks, bridges, wharves, and shipbuilding. It is good for steamed bent work where great strength and durability are needed.
Durian
-
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Falcata 
Albizaria Falcataria
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Gisok-Gisok 
H. Philippinensis 
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Governor's Plum 
Flacourtia Jangomas 
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Guava 
Psidium Guajava 
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Gubas 
Endospermum Peltatum 
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Guijo 
S. Guiso 
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Hagakhak 
D. Validus 
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Hairy-Leaf Apitong 
Dipterocarpus Philippinensis 
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Hauili 
Ficus Septica 
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Igem Dagat 
Podocarpus Costalis 
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Ilang-Ilang 
Cananga Odorata 
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Ipil 
Instia Bijuga 
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Ipil-Ipil 
Leucaena Leucocephala 
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Kalantas 
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Philippine mahogany, Philippine cedar
Kalimatas 
Phaeanthus Ebracteolatus
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Kalios 
Streblus Asper 
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Kaliot 
H. Malibato 
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Kaliuas 
Kayea Paniculata 
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Kalomata 
Clausena Brevistyla 
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Kalukoi 
Ficus Callosa
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Kamachile 
Pithecellobium Dulce 
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Kamagong 
Diospyros Philippensis 
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Kamuning 
Murraya Paniculata 
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Kasoy 
Anacardium Occidentale 
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Katmon 
Dillenia Philippinensis
This wood is used for posts, beams, joists, rafters, floorings, sheathings, and ceilings. It is also suitable for furniture and cabinet making.
Kilah 
Canarium Hirsutum 
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Kolalabang 
Saurauia Latibractea 
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Kulis 
Memecylon Ovatum 
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Kulispakatan 
Dimorphocalyx Luzoniensis
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Lamio 
Dracontomelon Edule
This wood can be utilized for all purposes requiring Dao wood.
Lumbang 
Aleurites Moluccana 
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Mabunot 
Gomphandra Luzoniensis 
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Magabuyo 
Celtis Luzonica
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Malapanau 
D. Kerrii 
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Malasapsap 
Ailanthus Integrifolia 
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Mangga 
Mangifera Indica 
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Manggachapui 
Hopea Acuminata 
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Maniknik 
Palaquium Tenuipetiolatum 
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Mayapis 
S. Palosapis 
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Moluccan Sau 
Paraserianthes Falcataria 
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Narig 
Vatica Mangachapoi 
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Nino 
Morinda Bracteata 
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Niog-Niogan 
Ficus PseudoPalma 
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Palosapis 
Anisoptera Thurifera 
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Panau 
Dipterocarpus Gracilis 
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Pandakaki 
Ervatamia Pandacaqui 
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Papaya 
Carica Papaya 
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Patangis
Talauma Villariana 
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Pototan 
Bruguiera Sexangula 
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Puso-Puso 
Neolitsea Vidalii 
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Putat 
Barringtonia Racemosa 
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Red Lauan 
S. Negrosensis
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Rimas 
Artocarpus Altilis 
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Saging-Saging 
Aegiceras Corniculatum 
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Salaking Pula 
Aglaia Elliptica 
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Salingkugi 
Albizia Saponaria 
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Santol 
Sandoricum Koetjape 
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Saplungan 
H. Plagata 
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Tadiang Anuang 
Canthium Monstrosum 
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Tagotoi 
Palaquium Foxworthyi 
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Tagpo 
Ardisia sSquamulosa 
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Tailed-Leaf Apitong 
Dipterocarpus Caudatus 
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Takip-Asin 
Macaranga Grandifolia 
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Takulao 
Miliusa Vidalii 
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Talitan 
Casearia Fuliginosa 
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Taluto 
Pterocymbium Tinctorium 
This wood is used as floaters for rafting heavy logs, fishnet floats, temporary construction; and for making boxes, matches and matchbox, veneer, and wooden shoes.
Tangisang Bayawak 
Ficus Variegata 
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Tanglin 
Adenanthera Intermedia 
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Tanguile 
S. Polysperma 
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Teak 
Tectona Grandis 
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Tibig 
Ficus Nota 
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Tindalo 
Afzelia Rhomboida 
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Toona Calantas
-
This wood is used for high-grade cigar boxes, furniture and cabinet work, interior finish [such as sheathings and ceilings], carving and sculpture, and planking and interior finish of boats and small launches; for making piano cases, musical instruments, Paddles and light oars, drawing boards, wardrobes and clothes chests, insect boxes, and dugout canoes. Philippine timber tree having hard red fragrant wood 
Tsaang Gubat 
Carmona Retusa 
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Ulayan
Philippine Oak Quercus
This is a beautiful wood. It is extensively used in making high-quality furniture. Furniture made of Oak from the tropics is considered a novelty.
White Lauan 
Shorea Contorta 
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Yakal 
S. Astylosa 
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Dipterocarp Forest
The Dipterocarp Forest is the most extensive type. It consists of large, tall trees which yield valuable wood, aromatic Oil, and resins. This type of forest is the main source of our timber supply.

The trees that grow in a dipterocarp forest are the Lauan family which are the Philippines Mahogany, Apitong, Yakal, Guijo, Mangastnoro, Palosapis, Manggachaput, and Narig. The woods of these trees vary in color and grain, durability, hardness and strength.
Molave Forest
The Molave forest is widely distributed but whenever found, it is no longer in great abundance. The molave forest is the source of extremely hard, durable and strong wood for construction requiring soft to strong wood in mechanical strength.

There are ten different tree species that make up the molave type forest. The most common are Dangula, Bongoog, Malatumbaga, Molave, and Lingo-Ingo. Molave woods are well known because of their many uses.
Pine Forest
The Pine forest is found in regions of very high elevations. There are two species making up this type of forest, namely Benguet Pine [P. Insularies], which is found in the Mountain Province and the Mindoro Pine (P. Merkusii) which is found in the Highlands of Zambales and on the Island of Mindoro.

The Pine forest is also a major source of resin and turpentine. Private landowners cultivate Pine seedlings which are sold as Christmas trees when they attain the sapling stage. The wood is good for furniture and interior finish.
Mangrove Forest
The Mangrove forest is found on tidal flats along the seacoasts, especially where the water is moderately salty. It thrives best in areas that are alternately covered or left bare by tides, along quiet bays, and mouths of large rivers.

The princiPal tree species found in this type of forest are Baauan, Busain, Pototan, Langarat, and Dungon-Late. The Nipa Palm which is found in this forest is a source of shingles for house roofing and walling. The Nipa flower is the source of a valuable sap which is made into wine or vinegar.
Beach Forest
The beach forest is usually found on sandy shores and in lowlands immediately above the high-tide line. The trees obtained from this forest are used princiPally for firewood. However there are trees that provide light materials that can be used for constructing houses and for making household implements. Trees found in this forest type include Talisay, Dap-Dap, Dungon, Palomaria, Agoho, Bani, and Tamalia. Dungon and Agoho lumber are familiar to people because of their various uses.
Mid-Mountain and Mossy Forest
The Mid-mMuntain and Mossy forest is found in mountainous regions. This forest usually covers the mountain ridges. The trees are generally short and stunted because of too much exposure to strong winds. The trunks and branches of trees in this forest are covered with mosses.

This forest type is also called a protection forest because it holds the soil together and protects land from erosion. This forest absorbs great quantities of water during heavy rains and regulates the flow of water runoff.

Some of the trees found in this forest are the Mala-Almaciga, Malakauayan, Makaasim, and Malabayabas.
Philippine Woods and Their Use
Philippines woods are known for their beauty and durability. Most are easy to work with and can be fashioned into useful articles. They vary in color, grain, and texture. Some are hard, heavy, and very strong. There are also numerous soft wood species.

Some of the Philippine woods and their uses are as follows:
Afu
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This wood is utilized for general construction purposes. Itis often used as substitute for both the red and white Lauan especially for making veneer and plywood and for ship planking.
Agoho
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This wood is used in making poles, paving blocks, house posts, bridges, and wharves. It is also good for beams joists, window sills, tool handles, firewood, and charcoal.
Agoho Del Monte
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This wood is used for piles, ties, and can practically take the place of Agoho.
Alupag
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This wood is used for general house construction such as for posts and sills, beams, joists, rafters, and floorings; for making primitive Sugar mills, presses, bearings, wooden anchors, combs, tree nails, harrow teeth, and other agricultural implements; for constructing saltwater piles, keels and keelsons of ships; and for other purposes where very hard and very heavy wood is required.
Amugis
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This wood makes excellent flooring because of its uniform dark red color. It is also used for general house construction, and for furniture and cabinet making.
Anahaw
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The trunk of this Palm is used for house posts and spear shafts. Strips of the trunk are used for house flooring. The hardwood is utilized as walking sticks.
Anang
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This wood is used for making scale and rulers, golf club heads, and bowling balls.
Anislag
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This wood is utilized for house posts, joists and rafters, agricultural implements, and tool handles.
Anonas
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This wood is used for temporary construction, and for making tool handles and agricultural implements.
Anubing
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This wood is used for houses posts, telegraph poles, piles, railroad ties, and bridges timber.
Api-Api
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This wood is utilized for making rice mortars and as fuel for smoking fish. Because of its peculiar color and attractive grain, the wood is a good material for making small cabinets.
Apitong
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Aranga
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This wood is used for building piles, wharves, bridges, posts, poles, ties, and paving blocks; and for floors and interior finish, sash, furniture, and cabinet work.
Arangen
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The wood is used for building houses and other structures. It can be a substitute for hard maple. The seeds of this tree yield a solid fat used for lighting.
Arangile
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This wood is used for interior finish; ship planking; for making automobile bodies, furniture, veneer and plywood; and for general construction purposes.
Ata-Ata
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This wood is used for temporary construction, for parts of houses made of light materials; and for making logging skids, scale sticks, and handles of agricultural implements. The sapwood of ata-ata is tough and utilized for making golf club heads and other articles where a tough, light-colored wood is needed.
Bagras
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This wood is used for interior finish; furniture and paper making; and for framing, beams, joists, and studs of houses. It can also be used as a substitute for the red lauan.
Bagtikan
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This wood is used for cabinet and furniture making, interior finish, veneer and plywood manufacturing, boat planking and framing, mine timber, and for general construction purposes.
Bakan
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This wood is used for railroad ties and paving blocks when treated; and for making house posts, furniture, and boxes.
Balakat
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This wood is moderately heavy but not very durable. It is used for light and temporary construction and making cheap furniture and boxes.
Balikbikan
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This wood is used for flooring, for making furniture and rice mortars and pestles. If properly treated, it may also be used as posts and as paving blocks.
Balinghasay
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This wood is used for making boxes, cheap furniture, cigar boxes, and for other light construction purposes.
Balobo
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This wood is used for making agricultural implements in the rural areas, for building house posts, and for other general construction purposes.
Balu
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This wood may be used making cabinets, musical instruments, scabbards, and fancy wood articles.
Banaba
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This wood may be used for making wharves, bridges, saltwater piles, ties, paving blocks, houses posts, beams, joists, flooring, rafters, interior finish, furniture, and cabinets.
Banaui
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This wood is used for house construction, for making furniture and novelties, and for wood carving.
Baniti
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This wood may be used for shi planking; and drawers and shelves, backs of scabbards, dressers, wardrobe cabinets, and other furniture. The wood makes god patterns.
Banuyo
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This wood is used for high-grade interior work, cabinet making; veneer and plywood making, gunstocks, pattern making, carving, and sculpture.
Batete
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This wood is used for making furniture and cabinets; for beams, joists, rafters, flooring, door sheathing, and other interior finish. The wood is also good as farm lumber and mine timber.
Batikuling
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This wood is used as a material for carving, sculpture, and pattern making; and for flooring and walling. Sacred images in Catholic Churches are made of this wood. It is resistant to termites.
Batino
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This wood is creamy white and moderately hard. It is used for house building, especially for rafters and sidings; and also for railroad ties.
Batitinan
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This wood is used for ship, wharf, and bridge building, including saltwater piles, ties, and paving blocks; for flooring, interior finish; and for furniture and cabinet work.
Batukanag
-
This wood is used for house posts, agricultural implements, beams, and windowsills; for bridge and wharf construction, and for any other purpose requiring strong and durable wood.
Bengal
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This wood is used for house posts, beams, joists, rafters and other structural timber, windowsills and flooring, and lathe-work.
Benguet Pine
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This wood is used for house construction, mine timber, and telephone and telegraph posts. It is common in Baguio and its surrounding communities.
Betis
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This wood is used for building wharves, ships and posts. They can also be turned and shaped into tool handles, or used as ties; paving blocks, and house posts.
Binggas
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The wood is used for general construction purposes, for ship planking, and for furniture, cabinet making.
Binuang
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This wood is light and used as buoys for rafts; and for making matches, bancas, and other temporary construction and boxes.
Bitanhol
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This wood is used for building bridges, boats and ships, especially for masts and spars; for making carriages and other vehicles, joists, rafters, flooring, furniture, cabinets, and hub shafts.
Bitaog
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This wood is used for flooring, sheathings, ceilings, ship sterns, keels, knees and ribs, vehicle-wheel hubs; and for making fine furniture, cabinets, gunstocks, and musical instruments.
Bogo
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This wood is used for furniture and cabinet work, interior finish, sculpture, veneer and plywood manufacturing, and for general construction purposes.
Bolon
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This wood is used in making agricultural implements and for construction purposes provided it is protected and from extreme weather changes. It is also used for making oars and as a substitute for hard maple in making bowling alleys and pins.
Bolong-eta
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This tree is a good substitute for ebony and kamagong. It is used for making furniture, cabinets, canes, tool handles, fingerboards and keys of pianos, guitars, violins, drawing instruments, shuttles, bobbins, spindles, combs and other novelties.
Busain
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This wood is used for saltwater piles, mine timber, and house posts; for furniture and cabinet work and for firewood and charcoal.
Canafistula
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This wood is used for posts, ties, beams, joists, rafters, floorings, interior finish, bancas, furniture and cabinets.
Dalinas
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This wood is used for making submerged piles, beams, joists, tool handles, and agricultural implements.
Dangula
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This wood is used for building saltwater piles, telephone and telegraph poles, house posts, machine foundations, and other purposes where very hard, heavy, and durable wood is needed.
Dao
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This wood is used for making furniture and cabinets of all kinds, veneer and plywood, and gunstocks as a substitute for circassian and black walNut. The wide buttresses of this wood make excellent tabletops.
Dap-Dap
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This wood is used largely for making fishnet floats, helmets, insulator boards, and similar articles requiring extremely light and soft wood.
Dita
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This wood is used for making furniture, wooden soles of shoes, musical instruments, scabbards, floats, and other light construction works.
Duha
-
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Ebony
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This wood is used for furniture and cabinet making; for inlaying; and for making canes, tool handles, fingerboards and keys of guitars and violins, drawing instruments, shuttles, bobbins, spindles, combs, and novelties.
Gatasan
-
This wood is used for house posts, paving blocs, beams, joists, rafters, piles, flooring, and agricultural implements.
Gisok
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This wood is used for bridge and heavy construction where woods of great strength are required. It is mostly used for door and window frames.
Gisok-Gisok
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This is used locally for house posts and temporary railroad ties.
Guava
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This wood is used for household and agricultural implements. It is also used in making handles of axes and other tools, tree nails, pestles, and posts for small houses, fence posts, stakes and yokes, and in making charcoal.
Gubas
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This wood s the best material for making matchsticks and matchboxes, and for veneer, wooden clogs, boxes, and other articles for which soft, light woods are needed.
Guijo
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This wood is used for constructing bridges, wharves, beams, joists, and other parts of the house; for furniture making; for vehicle framing, especially native carts, carriages, and automobile bodies; and for ship framing.
Haras
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This wood is very resistant t decay and insect damage. It can be used in making T-squares, rulers, chips, and other similar articles.
Himbabao
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The latex of this tree is used in healing obstinate ulcers. The flowers and leaves when cooked are eaten as vegetables.
Igem
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This wood is used in making spars and masts of sailboards; for house construction, carving, and flooring on account of its even texture; and for making household utensils.
Ilang-Ilang
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The wood is used locally for light household implements and for making scabbards. It is also good for posts and other structural parts of light houses.
Ipil
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This wood is used for high-grade construction. However it is also recommended for furniture and cabinet making, and any other purposes which durable and strong wood is required. This wood is used especially for house posts because of its strength and lasting qualities, for door and window jambs and frames because it shrinks and warps very slightly.
Ipil-ipil
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The native species of this wood are used for fences and for firewood.
Kaburo
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This wood is used for carving, sculpture, novelties, and for door framing and casing.
Kalaansanai
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This wood can be considered within the class of Guijo or Manggachapui in mechanical properties. It is good for flooring and windowsills, furniture and cabinet work, bridges and wharves, and other permanent structures.
Kalantas
-
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Kaliot
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This wood is used for beams, joists, and other part of houses, bridges and wharves. It is a favorite wood for framing native carts, carriages and automobile bodies, and ships, for furniture making; and for other purposes which require a strong wood.
Kalumpit
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This wood is used for genera construction, for furniture and cabinet making, and for ship planking.
Kalunti
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This wood is used for sidings, sheathings, ceilings, floors, door, interior finish, lighters, barges, boxes, furniture, and general temporary construction work.
Kamagong or Mabolo
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This wood can be used in place of ebony. In the world’s timber market, it could quality as a kind of ebony.
Kamatog
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This wood is used for house posts, beams, joists, floors, sheathings, ceilings, and furniture and cabinet work.
Kamuning
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This wood is used in making tool handles, turned and curved articles, paperweights, paper knives and other desk ornaments, walking canes, flutes, and billiard cues.
Karuksan
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This wood is not known in the market. But because of its pretty grain, it is good for interior finish and for cabinet work. The wood can also be used as ties and paving blocks.
Katmon
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This wood is used for posts, beams, joists, rafters, floorings, sheathings, and ceilings. It is also suitable for furniture and cabinet making.
Kato
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This wood is used for posts, beams, joists, rafters, floorings, door, windows, interior trims, furniture and cabinet work, bridges, wharves, and other heavy construction.
Kayatau
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This wood is used for door, window frames, and window sills.
Kayugalo
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This wood can be utilized for all purposes requiring the Supa wood.
Kubi
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This wood is used for all purposes requiring strength and great durability, such as house posts, telegraph poles, piles, railroad ties, bridges timber, among others. Generally, this wood s not sawn into lumber due to its hardness.
Kupang
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This wood is used for light and temporary construction; for cheap siding; for making boxes, wooden clogs, fishnet floats, rafts, bancas; and for other purposes requiring light, soft wood.
Lago
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This wood is used for making boxes, crafts, and for other purposes that do not require durability and strength.
Lamio
-
-
Lamog
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This wood is used for posts, beams, joists, rafters, flooring, and interior finish.
Lanete
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This wood is good for wood carving. It is also used for making furniture, wooden shoes, kitchen utensils, chairs, musical instruments, chests, turnery, window sills, and scabbards; and for other light construction purposes.
Langarai
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This wood is used for saltwater piles and mine timber. The wood is also good for house posts, and occasionally for furniture and cabinet work. It is utilized extensively for firewood and charcoal.
LaNipau
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This wood can be used as substitute for white lauan, lumbayau, and tangile. Hence the wood can be used for general construction purposes. However care should be taken because laNipau wood is not durable when exposed to the weather and when in contact with the ground.
LaNutan 
-
This wood is used for house posts, beams, joists, rafter of small houses, tool handle, carriage shafts, gunstocks, backs and sided of musical instruments, and cabinet work.
Liusin
-
This wood is resistant to attack of marine and wood borers. It is good for saltwater piles, interior framing, and for making charcoal. The wood is seldom sawn into boards as it is very difficult to saw.
Logo
-
This wood is used for temporary construction boxes, and for purposes which do not require durability and strength.
Loktob 
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This wood is used for making fishnet floats, bancas, and for other light or temporary construction purposes.
Lulilisian 
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This wood is used locally for house posts and temporary railroad ties.
Lumbang
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This tree is important particularly because of the Oil extracted from its seeds. The Oil is used for mixing paints and varnishes; and for protection of bottoms of bancas and other small craft against water marine borers.
Lumbayao 
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The wood is generally used for furniture and cabinet making of all kinds. It is likewise recommended for interior finish, ship and boat planking, and as raw material for making veneer and plywood. This wood is usually sold as Philippine mahogany on the international market.
Lumbayau-bata
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This wood is used for flooring, doors, interior finish, furniture and cabinet work, and for boat ribs and planking.
Mabolo or Kamagong
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This wood can be used in place of ebony. In the world’s timber market, it could quality as a kind of ebony.
Mahogany
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This wood is used for general building construction, and for making furniture cabinets, and musical instruments.
Makaasim
-
-
Malaanonang
-
This wood is more popular than white lauan and bagtikan, especially for interior finish and furniture because of its fine texture and good color.
Malabayabas
-
This wood is used for piles and for construction of bridges and wharves. It can also be used as substitute for mancono. It is hard, heavy, and very durable.
Malabingan 
-
This wood is used for paneling, furniture and cabinet work, gunstocks, boat planking; and in making musical instruments.
Malabog 
-
This wood is used for temporary construction. This tree grows big in diameter and is recommended for making cheap-grade veneer and plywood.
Malabulak 
-
This wood is used for telephone and telegraph poles. Whenever a newly-cut malabulak tree is placed on the ground, it takes root and grows. The wood is very soft, light colored, and seldom used for other purposes.
Malabunga
-
This wood is generally used for sculpture or for carving sacred images.
Malabuyo
-
This wood is used for temporary construction because it is not very durable.
Malaikmo 
-
This wood may be used for temporary construction only because it is readily attacked b insects. It decays immediately when exposed to moisture or when in contact wit the ground. It may be used for making tennis rackets.
Malakadios
-
This wood is used for poles, ties, bridges, wharves, ship’s sheathings, sidings, oars and paddles, carvings, and household implements; and for house construction, such as posts, beams, joists, rafters, flooring, windowsills, doors, and ceilings.
Malakakau 
-
This wood, although not well known, can be used for general construction purposes provided the wood is protected from the weather.
Malakamias
-
This wood is good for making wooden shoes, boxes, matchboxes and sticks, spear handles, bancas, and other articles requiring a soft, light wood.
Malakauyan 
-
The trunk of this tree is used for ship masts and the wood is good for paneling, interior finish, and for making household implements.
Malapaho 
-
This wood is used for interior finish, furniture and cabinet work. It is not resistant to decay and should not therefore be used for house construction.
Malapapaya
-
This wood is used for house posts, windowsills, agricultural implements and for general construction purposes requiring strength and fairly durable wood. It is also used for poles, ties, bridges, wharves, ship’s sheathings, sidings, oars and paddles, carvings, beams, joists, rafters, flooring, doors, ceilings.
Malatapai
-
This wood is used for construction purposes and furniture making.
Malatumbaga 
-
This wood is heavy and strong and is tremendously durable when exposed to the weather or in contact with the ground. It is used for general house construction purposes such as posts, beams, joists, rafters, flooring, windowsills, doors, ceilings. Furthermore It is used for poles, ties, bridges, wharves, ship’s sheathings, sidings, oars and paddles,  
Malubago
-
This wood is generally soft and light. It has very little commercial value. The wood is used as firewood and as floats for fishnets. The bark is used for making rope and cloth.
Malugai
-
This wood is also used for making beams, joists, rafters, flooring, ceilings and the interior finish of houses. It is good for boat framing, masts and spars; handles for pick, rake, and hoe; and furniture and cabinet work. The wood may be used for making athletic goods. The fruit is edible.
Manggachapui
-
This woodis generally good for bridges and other construction works requiring wood of great strength. It is extensively used for making doors and window frames in place of guijo for high-grade construction.
Manggasinoro 
-
This woodcan be used as a substitute for white lauan and almon wood.
Manggis
-
BecauseThis wood is not known in the market, is it seldom cut and sold. However it can be used for general construction where strength is needed. Protection from the changing weather is necessary in order for the wood to last long.
Mango
-
This wood is used for interior finish, furniture and cabinet work. It is relatively durable.
Mankono
-
d other novelties, pulleys, rollers, sheaves, bearings, saw guide blocks, and the bushing of propellers.
Mapilig 
-
This wood is used for making mallets, hammers, and other articles that require wood that is extremely hard, heavy, and tough.
Maranggo
-
This wood is used for cabinets, furniture, cases of musical and scientific instruments, and freight boxes. It is recommended for all purposes requiring genuine mahogany. Bird’s-eye lumber which is cut from this wood makes very attractive furniture.
Margapili
-
This wood is used for carving and sculpture; for making cabinets, trunks, and fancy boxes; and for sidings and ceilings. It is resistant against dry wood termites.
Matamata
-
This wood is used for saltwater piles because it is resistant to the attack of marine borers. It is very difficult to saw, but it can be used for internal framing requiring hard and strong wood.
Mayapis
-
This wood can be used for construction works, for furniture and cabinets work, for veneer and plywood manufacturing, and for all other purposes requiring red and white Lauan.
Miao
-
This wood is used for house construction, for carving, and for cabinet making.
Molave
-
This wood is recommended for all high-grade constructions in which both strength and durability are required. It is used for shipbuilding, sculpture; and for making posts, railroad ties, paving blocks, shuttles, furniture, floorings, window sills, frames of windows and doors, and balusters. Molave is one of the most widely used woods in the Philippines.
Nangka
-
This wood is used for making musical instruments, furniture, cabinets, frames, and tool handles. The bark is sometimes made into rope and cloth. This tree which produces one of the most popular fruits in the country, is also used in making yellow dye.
Narek
-
This wood is used for house posts and other permanent constructions. Because of its strength and durability, it has become one of the most commonly used woods in the country.
Narig
-
This wood is strong and very durable. It is suitable for high-grade constructions. It has a large sapwood which is perishable. The hardwood of Narig can be utilized as a substitute for the Sapwood of Molave. Narig is excellent for saltwater piles, telephone and telegraph posts, and for making engineering and scientific instruments. Its fine texture and hardness make it suitable also for king bobbins and shuttles.
Narra 
-
As the national tree of the Philippines, the Narra is durable even when exposed to all kinds of weather or in contact with the ground. It is good for high-grade furniture and fixtures, automobile bodies and interior drills or booths, radio and television cases, and for professional and scientific instruments. It can be used for making almost any articles where strong and beautiful wood is needed.
Nato 
-
This wood is used in making cheap cigar boxes bottoms and sides of drawers, shelves and backs of sideboards, dressers, wardrobes, and other cabinet work.
Pagatpat 
-
This woodis used for house construction, floorings, sidings, and interior finish; for constructing bridges, telegraph poles, and ties; for boat planking; and for making musical instruments and furniture.
Pahutan
-
This wood is used for general construction purposes and for making veneer and plywood. The sapwood of pahutan is susceptible to damage by wood termites and should not be used in permanent construction unless treated.
Palma-Brava 
-
This Palm is used for posts, pillars, and walking sticks. Spear shafts and bows are made from its outer sides. Split Palma-Brava trucks are used as primitive conduits in irrigations.
Palomaria 
-
This wood is used for bridges building and other general construction works; for making furniture, turnery, masts, spars, decks, oars, ship booms, keels, hubs and wagon shafts.
Pamitaogen
-
This wood is used for building bridges ships, boats, beams, joists, rafters, floorings; and for making various kinds of furniture and cabinets.
Philippine ChestNut 
-
This wood is used for general construction purposes.
Piagau
-
This wood is moderately hard, heavy, and durable. It is good for saltwater piles and for fine furniture work.
Pili 
-
This wood is used for house posts, lumber, ties, paving blocks, and furniture work. The resin is used for varnish and for caulking boats.
Pototan
-
This wood is used for saltwater and foundation piles, and cabinet work, and flooring.
Putian 
-
This wood is used for house construction, flooring and general framing in light constructions works.
Rain Tree
-
This wood is good for genera construction purposes and for furniture and cabinets work. The stumps, when made into veneer, are good for making fancy cabinets.
Red Lauan
-
Red Lauan is exported as dark red Philippines Mahogany and is used for many of the various uses of genuine Mahogany, such as furniture and interior work, veneer and plywood making, and boat planking. It has practically all the uses of genuine mahogany.
Sakat
-
This wood is used for ship planking and general construction purposes, provided it is protected from the weather.
Salain
-
This wood is widely known because of its strength and durability. It is used for general construction purposes, such as posts, beams, window sills, and for making agricultural implements.
Sampaloc 
-
This ornamental tree is used for beautifying avenues, streets, and plazas. The young leaves, flowers, and young pods are edible. Jams, sweets, and drinks such as sherbet are made from the fruit. The leaves are also used as bleaching materials.
Sandit
-
This wood is suitable for fine cabinet work, pattern making, carving, sculpture, interior finish, paneling, and fishnet floats.
Sangilo
-
This wood is used in the Mountain Province for carving for making walking sticks, jewelry boxes, and other novelties. It is also excellent wood for sport rifle stock and pistol grips.
Santol
-
This wood is used for carving and sculpture, house parts and light framing, ceilings, household implements, furniture and cabinet work. The fruit is edible.
Saplungan
-
This wood is used for general construction purposes, ship framing; for building wharves and railroad ties; and for other purposes where strength and durability are required. The buttress roots re made into rudders of ships and dug outs.
Sudiang 
-
This wood is used for building piles, poles, posts, beams, joists, rafters, bridges, wharves, ships, and paving blocks, and for making window sills, tool handles, agricultural implements, floors, doors, windows, walking canes tree nails, furniture, and cabinets.
Supa
-
This wood is valuable for high-grade furniture and cabinet work. It is also good for house construction especially for floorings, doors, and window frames and panels; for picture framing; and for making novelties, radio cabinets, and piano cases. This is one of the most beautiful woods in the Philippines.
Taba
-
This wood is used for constructing bridges, wharves, piles, posts, windowsills, joists, rafters, railroad ties; and for making tool handles and agricultural implements.
Tabau 
-
This wood is used for general construction purposes; for building piles, poles, and house posts; and for cabinets making.
Tabigi
-
This wood is used for poles, ties, posts, beams, joists, rafters, doors, floorings; for interior finish; and for high-grade furniture and cabinet work.
Tamayuan
-
The wood is used to make house posts, walking sticks, shuttles, and bobbins.
Tambulian
-
This wood is used for building piles, posts, ties, bridges, ships, wharves, and paving blocks. Because of its strength and durability, it is recommended for al high-grade and strong construction.
Tangal
-
This wood is good for telephone poles and temporary railroad ties. It is considered a first-class firewood and makes excellent charcoal.
Tanghas 
-
This wood is used for making wooden shoes, picture frames, carved jewel boxes , handles of kitchen and other household implements; and for sculpture and wood carving.
Tangile
-
This wood is known in the export trade as dark red Philippines mahogany. Because of its similarity to genuine mahogany in grain, texture, and physical properties, it is used as a substitute for the latter in furniture making and interior finish. It is also good for boat planking because it waterlogs longer than many woods used for similar purposes.
Tanglin
-
This wood is used for general construction such as for posts, beams, joists, rafter, floorings, and interior finish; and for furniture and cabinet making. It may be used as a substitute for ipil wood.
Teak 
-
This woos is used for high-grade construction of all kinds, furniture and interior finish, sculpture, and plywood veneer manufacturing.This wood is also good for shipbuilding because of its stability, as t shrinks and warps very slightly. It is very durable, hard, and strong.
Tiaong
-
This wood is not durable when exposed to weather and should be used only for interior work.
Tiga
-
This wood is used for wharf and bridges construction; for making house posts, windowsills, beams, joists, rafters, railroad ties, tool handles and wooden tools, and cabinets.
Tinaang-pantai
-
Just like the Tiaong, this wood is not durable when exposed to different kinds of weather. Therefore it should be used only for interior work and temporary construction purposes.
Tindalo 
-
This wood is considered one of the best timbers for making fine cabinets. The wood is best for high-grade furniture work and for interior finish. For house stairs, and floorings. It is also suitable for veneer and plywood making.
Tiwi
-
This wood is used for making wooden shoe soles, and handles of kitchen and other household implements.
Toog
-
This wood may be used for general construction purposes.
Tuai
-
this wood is suitable general construction work, provided it is protected from different kinds of weather. It is used for making posts and agricultural implements.
Ulian 
-
This is one of our commercial tree species. It is used for general construction purposes, furniture, and interior work. the bark is good sources for tannin.
Unik
-
This wood is very light. It is good for making bancas and cases of cigarettes, and for sheathing and ceilings.
Urung 
-
This wood is used for building ships, houses, posts, and piles. It is a strong and durable.
White Lauan
-
This wood is used for bat planking and for making veneer and plywood, boxes, crates, utensils, mining timber, and cabinets.
Yakal 
-
This wood is used for general high-grade construction such as in bridges and wharves and for all other purposes requiring durability and strength.
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Minor Forest Product
There are various products we derive from our forests other than timber but they generally have lower commercial value. Some of these products are used for food, clothing, and shelter. There are also minor forest products that are used as raw materials for handicrafts and various home industries.
Philippine Bamboos
The Bamboo belongs to a family of large grasses. Many of them produce big stems but they are not considered trees. They usually grow in clusters simultaneously from the ground. Their tems do not have primary branches at the top which form the crown. In addition, Bamboos develop small branches on their nodes. They have a well-developed hollow pith that is not found in most tree species.

There about 700 species of Bamboos all over the world. Of these, 30 species are known to exist in the Philippines. We have 7 erect, or standing Bamboos and 3 climbing ones.

Bamboos are used as construction materials. In the rural areas we can find houses which use Bamboos for their posts, roofs, walls, and floors. They are also used for building temporary bridges, fences, rafts, and fish traps; and for making chairs, cupboards, tables, beds, benches, flower pots, and musical instruments. Bamboos are likewise used as raw materials in the manufacture of high-quality pulp and paper.

The most common Bamboos we have in the Philippines are the following:
Balo
-
This is a stout Bamboo reaching a height of 20 meters and culm with a diameter of 20 centimeters. The stems are used for temporary water pipes and for fish traps. This Bamboo is not usually durable; hence it is very rarely used for construction purposes.
Bayog
-
This is graceful Bamboo with slender stalks, forming large culms. This is good for all purposes where strength is required. The green culms are split and are made into rope.
Bikal or Usiu 
-
This Bamboo is also known as indi and babui to Bicolanos. This is widely distributed and is well known to wooden and forest officers because it stores good drinking water in its internodes. It has a thick wall and is good for the manufacture of furniture.
Boho
-
This is also known as Bagakai in Samar. This Bamboo reaches a height of about 10 metres and the culm attains centimetres in diameter. This Bamboo is widely distributed all over the country. In the Visayas islands, this Bamboo is generally used in making fish corrals and fences.
Kawayan China
-
This Bamboos is native of china and Japan but has become popular in the Philippines. This is generally used for ornamental purposes. The stem is good for fishing rods.
Kawayankiling
-
This is known as Tewanak to the Tagalogs and sinambang to the Visayans. It has a smooth stem, usually yellowish green in color. This Bamboo is used for house construction and furniture making. It is also cultivated for ornamental purposes.
Lopa
-
This Bamboos is generally found in Nueva Ecija and Benguet. The supply is very limited and is now nearing extinction.
Patong
-
This Bamboo is also called Botong. This is a tall, rafted, spineless Bamboo which is generally used as a building material for houses. It is widely distributed in the country.
Spiny Bamboo
-
This is known locally as Kawayan Tinik. This is used for building construction because of its strength and durability. It is also good as a raw material in the manufacture of pulp and paper, baskets, hats, and other similar articles.
Utod
-
This Bamboos is small and short. It is found only in the high areas of Benguet and the Mountain Province where it is used as pipe stems by the natives.
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Philippine Palms
There Are 23 species of Palms that are known to be native to the Philippines. Most of these Palms are not found in other countries.

Some of the Philippine Palms have a high economic value because they produce alcohol, starch, Sugar, Oil, and other substances used in industrial work.

The most useful Palms are the following:
Ambung
-
This Palm is generally for ornamental purposes but its buds are edible.
Anahaw
-
This is one of the popular Palms in the Philippines. The trunks are used as house posts. They are shiny and beautiful when cleaned and polished. The outer part of the trunk, when removed and split, is used as flooring. The wood is hard and is good for making bows, spars, shafts, canes, and walking sticks.

The bud of Anahaw is edible. Its leaves are used for roofing and for making shingles, primitive raincoats, and sun hats or salakot.
Anibong
-
This is a tall and slender Palm. The outer part of the trunk is very hard and durable. This is used for flooring and spear shafts. Its bud is edible.
Boga
-
This is good for ornamental purposes. It is also known as pita and is found in Palawan and Mindoro.
Bunga
-
This is a tall and slender Palm found throughout the Philippines especially in the virgin forest of Palawan. The fruits are used extensively for chewing with lime and the leaves of Betel pepper.
Bunga de China
-
This is known to exist only in the Philippines. It is also known as bunga de jolo and is found in abundance in Palawan and Coron Island. The fruits are used as a substitute for the Betel Palm Nut or bunga for chewing.
Buri
-
This is the largest and most stately Palm in the Philippines. Its trunk attains a diameter of 1 metre. It reaches a height of 20 metres. The sap is used in making native wine [Tuba], alcohol, vinegar, syrup, and Sugar. Starch is obtained from its trunk. The buds and kernels of the fruits are edible.

Fibers obtained from the petiole of a Buri Palm are made into the famous buntal or lukban hat. Fibers secured from the ribs of the unopened leaves are used in the manufacture of the so-called calasiao or pototal hats. Strips of the unopened leaf are made into hats, mats, bags, sacks, sails, baskets, and other articles.
Coconut
-
This is the most popular Palm in the Philippines. It is widely cultivated all over the country, and it is the most important commercial Palm in the world. Referred to as the tree of life, the Coconut offers various uses and benefits to mankind.

It yields materials for timber, food, fermented and unfermented drinks, alcohol, vinegar, splits, strips, fiber for making baskets, mats, rope, hats, brushes, brooms, fuel, caulking, food Oil, cooking Oil, soap, a substitute for butter and lard, ointment, Oil cake, animal feeds, and fertilizer. The buds are good for making salads.

Oil is most important product of the Coconut Palm. The dried kernel, known as copra, is one of the top export products of the Philippines.
Dumayaka
-
This is small-sized Palm that is good for ornamental purposes. It is generally cultivated in princiPal cities throughout the country for its beauty. Dumayaka Palm is also known as abigi, gumaka, banisan, baris, batbat, belis, and tipon-tipon. This Palm yields a sap known as Tuba and produces materials used in the manufacture of various types of baskets.
Ivory Nut [Polynesian]
-
This Palm was introduces to the Philippines by the Spaniards. Also known as Timbuan, it is widely distributed in Panay and Zamboanga. Its large seeds are hard and ivory like in texture and appearance. These seeds are used for making buttons.
Kaliso
-
This Palm is also known as sokalen. It bears a fruit used by the Manobos as a substitute for the Betel Nut. The sap is collected and used as a beverage.
Kaong
-
This is a large Palm. It is also known as Sugar Palm, cabo, negro, and hibiok. This Palm yields Sugar and starch. The sap is made into a fermented drink and alcohol, while the leaves are used as thatching materials. It also yields fibers that are utilized in industrial work and in other minor products.
Nipa
-
This is another popular Palm in the Philippines. The leaves are used extensively for roofing and walling of houses in both urban and rural areas. The leaflets are also used in making slakots, fans, baskets, mats, bags, and wrapper of tobacco that are smoked by the rural folks. The midribs are good in making brooms, baskets, and for trying fish sold in the market. The petiole is used as fuel. The seed is edible.

The Nipa Palm is a source of high-grade alcohol and vinegar. Native wine [Tuba] is made from the sap extracted from the Nipa Palm. This is used extensively as a beverage by the barrio folks.
Pugahan
-
This is also called fish tail. This Palm is a source of Tuba or Palm wine. From the lower part the petiole are obtained soft, flossy fibers used as tinder which is needed for caulking boats. The petiole is also a source of splints used in making baskets. The outer part of the trunk s good for flooring. The bud is edible.
Rattan
-
This is one of the most important Palms of the Philippines because of high economic value. Rattan is found in abundance in nearly all virgin forests, except near the top of high mountains. The stems are used for making “bent-wood” chair frames, cables, and support for suspension bridges. Rattan is very good for furniture making. The split cans are used for making mats, hats, baskets, fish traps, and for tying purposes. The fruit is edible.
Sagisi
-
This Palm is tall and slender. It is widely distributed all over the Philippines. This is known by other names such as salanig and tagise. The bud is edible. Splints from the petiles are used in making salakots.
Sago
-
This Palm is very important in Central and Southern Philippines because of high concentration of starch in its pith. The starch is made into Sago which is used in making native delicacies, ice cream, and halo-halo. Part of the petioles and the midribs of the leaflets are used in making mats and baskets.
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Major Products from Philippines Palms
The following are some of the major end products obtained from he different Philippine Palms:
Alcohol
Obtained from the sap of Nipa, Buri, Coconut, Dumayaka, Sago, and Sugar Palms
Bags
Obtained from the sap of Nipa, Buri, Coconut, Dumayaka, Sago, and Sugar Palms
Baskets
Made from the split petiole of Dumayaka, Sugar, Coconut, Buri, and Pugahan Palm; from the fibers of the husks of Coconuts; split leaves of Buri and stems of Rattan Palms.
Beads
Come from the seeds of Buri Palm
Blow guns
Fashioned out of the outer wood of tarau and Anahaw Palms
Bowls
Made from the mature shells of Coconut
Bows
Made out of the outer wood of Anahaw Palm
Brooms
Made from the cleaned midribs of the leaves of Buri, Coconut, Sugar, and Nipa Palms
Brushes
Made out of the fibers of Coconut husks and the bases of the leaves of the Sugar Palm
Buttons
Made from the mature seeds of Buri, Ivory Nut, Palms, and from the shells of Coconuts
Buyo
Obtained from the fruits of Betel Nut [Bunga], Bungade China, Kaliao, Bungan-Ipot, Sagisi, Anibong, and Pinangga Palms; is the main ingredient for Betel chew
Caulking materials
Supplied by the soft fibers obtained from Sugar, Coconut, and Pugahan Palms - supplied by the soft fibers obtained from Sugar, Coconut, and Pugahan Palms
Charcoal
High-grade charcoal is made out of the shells of Coconuts
Cups
Made out of the shells of Coconuts
Dye
Taken from the Betel Palm
Fertilizer
Produced from the Kernel of the Coconut fruits, after the Oil has been extracted
Fibers
Supplied by Coconut, Nipa, Pugahan, Sugar, Cabo Negro, Buti, and Rattan Palms
Fishing rods
Made from the hard wood of Anahaw Palm
Fish traps
Made out of the split canes of the Rattan Palm and the trunk of Anahaw Palm
Flooring materials
Supplied by the hard outer wood of Anahaw, Anibong, and Coconut Palm
Food
Obtained from the fruits of the Coconut, Nipa, Buri Sugar, and Rattan Palms; and the buds of Betel, Sugar, Coconut, Buri, Sagis, Sago, Anahaw, and Anibong Palms
Fuel
Supplied by the kernels of Coconuts; Coconut shells are also used as a substitute for coal; the dried petiole of all Palms are used for fuel
Furniture
Pieces of furniture are made from the stem of Rattan Palm
Hats
Made out of material from Buri, Rattan, Betel, Coconut, Sagisi, Anahaw, and Nipa Palms
Lumber
Supplied by the mature trunks of Coconuts, Buri, Anahaw, Pugahan, and Sugar Palms
Mats
Made out of the leaves of Buri and Coconut Palms
Medicine
When taken regularly, the water inside the young fruit of the Coconut Palm is believed to have medicine value
Oil
Extracted from the kernel of the Coconut fruit
Ornamental plants
Most Palms are cultivated for ornament purposes
Posts
Supplied by the trunk of Coconut and Anahaw Palms
Raincoats
Primitive raincoats are made out of the Anahaw Palm
Slippers
Made from the lower sheath like part of the leaf stalks of the Betel Palm and the outer part of the petioles of Buri Palm
Spear hafts
Made from the hard outer wood of Anahaw, Anibong, and Pinangga Palms
Starchx
Made from the hard outer wood of Anahaw, Anibong, and Pinangga Palms
Sugar
Obtained from the Sugar, Buri, Nipa, and Coconut Palms
Syrup
Manufactured from the sap of the various Palms
Tannin
Obtained from the fruits of the Betel Nut Pal
Thatching materials
Supplied by Nipa, Coconut, Anahaw, and Sago Palms
Timber
Supplied by the old stems of Coconut, Anahaw, Sago, and Anibong Palms
Tinder
Obtained from the fine fibers of Sugar and Pugahan Palms
Vermifuge
Supplied by the fruits of the Betel Nut Palm
Vinegar
Made out of the sap of Nipa, Sugar, Coconut, and Buri Palms
Walking sticks
Fashioned out of the outer parts of the stem of Anahaw, and the whole stem of the Pinangga and Rattan Palms
Wine
A local beverage known as Tuba is produced from the sap of Coconut Palm and Basi from Nipa Palm
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Oil, Resins and Gums
Some of the important products of the Philippines forests are Oil, resins, and gums. Some of them have high economic value. They are obtained from trees, bushes, shrubs, Palms, and vines in our forests.
Bleaching
The leaves of Sampaloc and Pandakaki are used as bleaching agents.
Candle
This is made out of the Oil of Coconut, Koron-Koron, Pongam, Lumbang, Bagui Lumbang, physic Nut, Castor, Arangen, Pitjoeng, and Petchouli Oil.
Caulking Material
This is supplied by the pagsahingan resin, Palosapis resin, Balau, and Baguio Lumbang Oil mixed with Lime and Bamboo.
Chewing Gum
This is made out of Gumihan, Anubing, Katurai, and Chicle.
Color Dye
The seeds of Annatto or Achuete tree produce substances from which orange or red, yellowish brown, lemon-yellow, deep blue, green, violet, and deep green colors are prepared.
Color Dye
The leaves of Talisay, added with mud, produce a black color, while its bark produces a brown shade.
Color Dye
The stem of the Tokod-Tokod tree and the Heartwood of Evenaceae produce black color. 
Color Dye
The leaves of Payangit produce a light blue color. The chili pepper leaves produce a green color.
Color Dye
The leaves and young stem of Deora or Taoda produce yellow orange and deep red colors. The root of Bangoro is the sources of red, purple, and chocolate colors. The roots of dilaw produce a yellow color.
Flavoring
The Oil used in preparing flavorings are from Peanut, Pili Nut, Sweet Flag, Dilaw, Ginger, and Kaumnis.
Glue and Gum
These are obtained from the Ceballos Del Onte, Anubing, Gumihan, Aroma [Acacia], Katurai, Binuga, and Chico.
Incense
Incense is used in Catholic church services. This is prepared from the Manila Copal or Almaciga and the Batete Resin.
Lighting
Oil for illuminating purposes are obtained from the following: Manila Copra, Supa, Pagsahingan, Koron-Koron, Manila Elimi, Palosapis Resin, Balau, Coconut, Peanut, Pongam, Petroleum Nut, Pili Nut, Balukang, Piagau, Lumbang, Bagui-Lumbang, Physic Nut, Bitaog, Malakmalak, Baraibai, Ben, Borneo, Borneo Tallow, Botong, Putat, and Betis.
Lubrication
Lubricating materials are prepared from Castor Oil, Borneo Tallow, and Physic Nut Oil.
Medicine
The Oil used in the manufacture of medicine are from Pongam, Banate, Langitngit, Bitaog, Barak, Champakang Puti, Kalingang, Mindanao Cinnamon, Basil, and Camphor.
Paint
Oil as raw material for making paint comes from Supa, Tamarind Seed, Lumbang, Bagui-Lumbang and kalumpang.
Paste
This is made from the Anunang Gum.
Perfume
Some of the sources of the Oil used in making perfumes are Kayugalo, Aroma or Acacia Flower, Lemon Grass, Calamus, Vertiver, Champaca, Ilang-Ilang, Kabugau, Samayau, Petchouli, Toddalia, Asiatica, and Sweet Flag.
Pomade and Cosmetics 
These are prepared from the Oil of Coconut, Baraibai, Aroma Flower, Samuyau, Gurong-Guro and Petchouli.
Preservatives
The sources of resin and is used in preparing preservatives are the Almaciga, Turpentine, Supa, Manila Elimi, Pagsahingan, Balau, Lumbang, baguiLumbang, Castor, and Cashew Nut
Rubber
This is obtained from the Kalipaya or Gutta-Percha Trees and Lisid Vine, Cugtung-Ahas Vine, and Chilce.
Sealing wax
For making Sealing Wax, Almaciga Resin is the best material.
Varnish
The raw materials used in manufacturing varnish are supplied by Manila Copal, Turpentine, Sup, Tamarind Seed, Amnila Elimi, Palsapis, Balau, Lumbang, Castor, and Cashew Nut.
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Ancestral Building Materials • 37 Angeles St., Alabang Hills Village, Alabang, Muntinlupa City, Philippines • [+632] 807.2511